Kare about Mac

Mac 1990

I met my first Mac in the late 80’s as a student at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, thus beginning a life-long love affair with Apple. However, since starting my new job a few months ago, I’ve been using a PC for the first time in my life. So, let’s just say I’ve been getting a little sentimental about the genius that is Macintosh. Which got me to thinking about Susan Kare, the pioneering San Francisco-based designer who created the original iconography for Apple. Susan served on our Board of Directors when I was the VP Creative at Manhattan Toy, and I’m pretty sure I remained star-struck throughout my tenure there. I remember vividly that she would attend early morning board meetings with wet hair and sunglasses – a trait which I have idolizing-ly copied …well, the wet hair part, anyways. I’ve never quite mustered the coolness factor to pull off the shades. At any rate, she now offers high-quality giclee prints of her memorable icons, which I think are amazing. All prints are hand signed in editions of 100 or 200, and available in a variety of sizes for between $89 – $499. (As always, click to shop!)

Bomb Signed Print, $89-$499
“The bomb was designed to represent a system failure — and I was told that no one would ever be likely to see it. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case. Once a phone call came into the Mac software group: a woman had seen the icon on her screen and was extremely concerned that her computer might explode!” — SDK
smiling-computer-detail
“This print features the computer image seen at startup from the original Macintosh” -SDK
watch-detail
“This icon is a wait cursor–shown to indicate that something is happening that takes a little time, and that the computer hasn’t frozen. It replaced the traditional hourglass, with the idea of modernizing the concept!” -SDK

trash-detail

paint-fill-detailunhappy-computer-blue

3 thoughts on “Kare about Mac

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  1. These are so funny! Taking me back to elementary school Computer Class. Those computers would freeze up all the time while we played Oregon Trail and we’d have to restart each one at least twice per class. I’m so thankful for modern technology!

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